Sea ducks in the centre of the country


Sunday Morning dawned clear and cold with a surprisingly light breeze. We drove up to Stoke Bardolph in the bright winter sunshine. Turning beside the sewage works we drove towards the village and finally found ourselves beside the river. In the bright light, everything appeared more vivid than usual and the whole scene had the air of a dream or a story with the slow winding river, the fringes of trees and the fields on either side. Among these trees were nearly a hundred fieldfares and redwings feeding on the fields.

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On the left-hand side of the river, a wind turbine was visible high above the hedges and fields.

I have always found these beautiful, especially when compared to electricity pylons and this one was turning steadily. The power lines hummed and crackled as we walked beneath them. On the river, to our right-hand side, a flotilla of tufted ducks drifted in the current. It took only a moment before we picked out the female scaup with the huge white blaze above the bill the lack of the crest and the greater size.

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A photographer attempting to get a closer shot drove the flock across the river but they gradually returned. In the meantime, a flash of yellow flew across the path and I cursed having missed a possible gray wagtail. A few minutes later the gray wagtail appeared beside the outflow balancing on a railing and showing itself to great advantage.

Image is courtesy of the wildlife trusts many thanks

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I obtained excellent views and was looking forward to investigation the swans I could see further down the river, but as we stood there the mist came down and the whole scene was engulfed, the view obliterated and even the turbine was obscured. What could we do but drive home? We found a whole flock of geese further along the road and stopped to photograph them and search for any rarer species. On the way home, we decided to call at Long Eaton Meadows to look for this common scoter reputed to be present on the gravel pits. It was damp and dull by the time we arrived and parked on a sodden and muddy lane. We both searched for a few minutes over a cold lake, with a piercing wind blowing directly at us before we found the common scoter. Image is courtesy of Nottinghamshire Birdwatchers Many thanks

Image is courtesy of Nottinghamshire Birdwatchers Many thanks

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Again we had an excellent view as it dived and swam about. Usually, these ducks are obscured by the waves and breakers, but on a flat gravel pit it presented an excellent view and we were able to fully appreciate the plumage for possibly the first time. We watched the bird for some twenty minutes until the rain commenced in earnest and sleet particles began to trickle down our necks. Still, three new species were seen and excellent views of all three obtained.

Once again hope you enjoyed hearing about our adventures. Kind regards Mum

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